Bless the African Rains

needlekind:

if you get a group of at least five people between their late teens and early/middish twenties and have one of them quote spongebob squarepants i swear to god they can kill half an hour at minimum just quoting random and often unrelated spongebob snippets back and forth at each other nigh verbatim without any other conversation, this is basically science

jakemalik:

when teachers start lecturing the whole class about how they’re wasting so much of their time, and end up just wasting even more time

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Eeveelutions

cigarette-scents:

always sassy, sometimes classy

cigarette-scents:

always sassy, sometimes classy

ringostarring:

ok, new theory. maybe we should play so quietly, no one can hear us

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well maybe we would sound so bad if some people didn’t try to play with big meaty claws

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what did you say, punk?

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bIG

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MEATY

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CLAWS

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WELL THESE CLAWS AIN’T JUST FOR ATTRACTING MATES

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BRING IT ON OLD MAN, BRING IT ON

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no people let’s be smart and bring it OFF

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OH SO NOW THE TALKING CHEESE IS GONNA PREACH TO US

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gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.

gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.

meshinator:

AIR FORCE HUA

meshinator:

AIR FORCE HUA


theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]